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Screening Recommendations

American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons website for patients:  

The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons recommend:

  • Regular colorectal screenings after age 50
  • Eat a low-fat, high fiber diet
  • Eat between 25 to 30 grams of fiber each day from fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread and cereals, nuts and beans.
  • Drink alcohol only in moderation
  • Not smoking
  • Moderate exercise at least 20 minutes three to four days each week

American Colorectal Society recommends:

  • Regular colorectal screenings after age 50
  • Talk to your doctor about earlier screening
  • Personal or family history of colorectal cancer
  • Personal or family history of colorectal polyps
  • Personal or family history of inflammatory bowel disease

Answer the following questions to see if you are at risk for developing colon and rectal cancer:

  1. Are you age 50?
  2. Do you or a family member have a history of colon polyps?
  3. Do you or a family member have a history of colon cancer?
  4. Do you have chronic inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis?
  5. Do you or a family member have a history of ovarian, endometrial or stomach cancer?
  6. Are you of African American or Hispanic descent?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you could be at risk of developing this disease. Talk to your doctor about getting tested for colon and rectal cancer.

March is Colorectal Awareness Month

Founded by the Cancer Research Foundation of America in collaboration with the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable and the American Digestive Health Foundation.

Baylor-Scott & White-Hillcrest along with Board Certified Colon and Rectal Surgeon, Dr. Johnny Howton and other local Specialists and General Practitioners volunteer their time sponsoring a Colon Cancer Screening Clinic annually one Saturday during the month of March. Anyone is invited to attend this clinic.

Screening and Surveillance

Colon and Rectal Screening is testing to identify whether a person with no symptoms has colon or rectal cancer or a disease or condition that may lead to such cancer.

Surveillance is similar testing for people who have previously had colorectal cancer or pre-cancerous conditions.

Screening Tests

  • Fecal Occult blood testing uses chemical testing of stool samples to detect tiny, invisible amount of blood.
  • Flexible sigmoidoscopy is a safe, effective means of visually examining the lining of the sigmoid colon and rectum, using a long, flexible, sterilized, tubular instrument.
  • Colonoscopy is similar to sigmoidoscopy but the lining of the entire length of the colon is examined. Most colonoscopies are done under sedation on an outpatient basis with minimal inconvenience and discomfort.
  • Barium Enema is an X-ray test done with the colon filled with dye and air to make the lining visible.
  • Virtual Colonoscopy uses CAT scans done while the colon is filled with air. Computer programs combine the CAT scan pictures into a whole colon image.

Why Central Texas Colorectal and General Surgery?

As a part of Hillcrest Baptist Medical Center, Scott & White Healthcare, Central Texas Colorectal and General Surgery strives to provide excellence in patient care through providing comprehensive Colorectal and General Surgery services in the Central Texas Area.